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CONSERVATION SERVICES

We love the great outdoors and New Zealand’s unique and diverse ecology. Our conservation and bio security division provides specialist and trained workers devoted to conservation principles. New Zealand has a unique ecosystem which is carefully managed and monitored by the Department of Conservation (DOC) with support from specialists across the country. Biosecurity is critical to our native species as it helps to prevent damage caused by unwanted organisms such as animal pests, weeds, didymo, and diseases like kauri dieback.

Abseil Access Ltd are registered with AsureQuality as part of the urgent response Nationwide biosecurity response team working closely with Department of Conservation, City Councils, and the Army Training Group providing services such as Rare Species Identification & Relocation and Weed Eradication.


  • Rope Access & Specialist Access
  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Surveying
  • Helicopter and Boat Access
  • Rare Species Identification
  • Location of Rare Flora and Fauna
  • Relocation of Indigenous Species
  • Risk Mitigation
  • Repeat Monitoring & Mapping
  • Weed Eradication
  • Weed Eradication & Disposal

CONSERVATION SERVICES

RARE SPECIES IDENTIFICATION & RELOCATION

Remote mountainous regions, cliffs, and gorges are often especially rich in rare and vulnerable plant species. Our staff have NZQA-accredited training and can provide information on any indigenous species and their habitats. Some of our services include:



  • Helicopter & Boat Access
  • Rope Access and Abseiling
  • Location of Rare Flora and Fauna
  • Site Surveying and Inspection
  • Relocation of Indigenous Species
  • Risk Mitigation Support
  • Mapping and Repeat Monitoring

WEED ERADICATION BIO SECURITY

The native flora of New Zealand is unique as it evolved in isolation for millions of years with 80% of our trees, ferns, and flowering plants only found in our country. With over 200 plant species now considered pests, our protected natural areas are facing concerning ecological threats, and continued conservation efforts are critical to the protection of our native flora.

Since 1995, Abseil Access has developed specialised access and control techniques for removing pest plant material from these places. Locations of weeds are recorded using photographs and GPS, so control methods can then be implemented. On completion, clients receive a detailed report of the scope of work.



  • Helicopter & Boat Access
  • Rope Access and Abseiling
  • Grid search and mapping
  • Identification and location
  • Removal and disposal
  • Mapping and Repeat Monitoring
  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Surveying

EVERYONE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

If you are a passionate conservationists like the Abseil Access team, we recommend you check out the Department of Conservation (DOC) website to see how can help protect our native habitats and animal life. Some of the ways you can support include:



  • Volunteer Activities
  • Education Programs
  • Donate to a Conservation Project
  • Business Support to DOC Projects
  • Training in Conservation
  • Summer Internship Programs
  • A Conservation Project for DOC

PROJECT EXAMPLES

PORT HILLS LIZARD RECOVERY & RELOCATION

The Christchurch earthquakes in 2011 resulted in loss of habitat for the dwindling & nationally protected skink & gecko populations.

Abseil Access got together with conservation herpetologists and the council to mitigate the risks to the protected lizard species and re-locate individuals to safer environments.

Over 200 geckos and skinks were rescued, including the discovery of two spotted skinks, not thought to inhabit the Port Hills area.

LITTLE BARRIER ISLAND WEED ERADICATION

Little Barrier Island is New Zealand's largest unmodified and non-browsed native forest. It is one of NZ most important nature reserves.

The discovery of the noxious weeds Asparagus Scandens, Mexican Devil, and Pampas started one of NZ largest weed eradication programs.

Abseil Access Ltd were called upon to determine the extent of the problem on the 120m high sea cliffs, and to date, surveying over 5kms of cliff face.

WAIOURU ARMY TRG AREA - WEED ERADICATION

The habitat of tussock and alpine beech has been invaded by Pinus Contorta over the past 40 years. Weeds and pests have been tackled thoroughly and the Contorta eradication is the largest of its type in New Zealand.

Amongst the rugged landscape are numerous mountain gorges up to 300m deep with sheer rock walls to which the Contorta cling. Abseil Access have been systematically searching these areas since 1995 on a 3-year rotation of each of the 23 designated areas using rope access and helicopter access.

RANGITIKEI RIVER GORGE - WHITE BRYONY ERADICATION

The Rangitikei River cuts a winding path through the Kaimanawa foothills for more than 30km, creating cliffs up to 200m high. Despite the terrain, the cliffs are heavily vegetated hosting the noxious weed White Bryony. Abseil Access were awarded a sizable eradication programme. Over 300 rope access drops up to 200m high were completed. White Bryony is a seasonal vine that grows into the high canopy and smothers native bush. It has a large subterranean tuber that is cut and poisoned. On female plants the vines must be untangled and all the berries collected. All cuttings and berries are then disposed in sealed composting areas.


MERCURY ISLANDS - BOXTHORN ERADICATION

There are five small islands in the Mercury group which are all nature reserves. The bare coastal cliffs are up to 150m high and have become home to the noxious weed Boxthorn. Boxthorn itself is a highly problematic species. Its hard woody stem support stiff limbs which carry perpendicular thorns up to 100mm long. The plant can trap birds and the cuttings adhere to the surrounding bush. Abseil Access Ltd were called upon to determine the extent of the problem . Abseil drops are established over infested areas and the number and location of the plants were mapped for future eradication and monitoring.

FIORDLAND NATIONAL PARK - SINBAD SKINK

Abseil Access were engaged by the Department of Conservation to search a 300m high alpine cliff in a remote part of the Fiordland National Park to identify and photograph a Sinbad Skink. This required helicopter access and saw the team camping on-site for the duration of the scope. The skink was believed to only live on the cliff but had never been found. Three DOC lizard experts joined our team (watching from the side) for three days while we patiently and quietly abseiled down the cliff, waiting on the ledges for up to 6 hours. On day three, the team spotted one and successfully photographed it.